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Rosé wines are back 

20 & 21 November 2017

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Rosé wines are back 

20
Oct 2017

The case of rosé wine deserves an in depth analysis. In the past, it was once a by-product of the making of red wines: after barreling, a part of the “stained” must was extracted in order to obtain a more concentrated red wine, and was fermented independently; or either rosé wine was made in areas or vineyards, where its ageing was complicated, or with varieties which were not considered “noble” for the making of red wines. For a long time, it was like that, at best, a fresh pleasant wine to be drunk during summer and completely detached from gastronomy. 

Little by little, rosé’s making has become more refined (cold skin maceration for a limited period of time, direct pressing and “bleeding”) and more technical in order to pamper the fragile “stained” must; and specific yeasts were applied. Rosés have become more complex thanks to the blending of several varieties, the most common Pinot Noir, Syrah, Grenache, Merlot, Malbec, Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, Sangiovese and Zinfandel. This results in suitable wines throughout the year, with a sophisticated nose, very supple tannins and a fresh acidity that goes well with joyful meetings, as recommends Los Angeles Times, and pairs with several recipes as suggested by Food & Wine, or as encapsulated by the blog of Ovinum 

Following the success story of Provencal rosés, what was merely a by-product became a fashionable wine enjoyable throughout the whole year and extraordinarily well ranked in the market. Coupage of Carignan, Cinsaut, Grenache, Mourvèdre and Syrah, together with the expertise of doing things right for many years, has become a model to imitate. And oenologists’ Art of Blending Wine had much to do with its success. 


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